Wednesday, January 04, 2012

Australia Return A Favor

On Day 2 of the Sydney Test Match in 2004, India scored 366/2, progressing from an overnight score of 284/3 to end Day 2 on 650/5. VVS Laxman made 178 and Sachin Tendulkar reached 220 not out, on his way to an eventual 241 not out. On Day 2 at Sydney in 2012, Australia have returned the favor, taking advantage of a flat wicket and an Indian attack that couldn't find a pair of bowlers who could exert some control over proceedings even for a spell of play during the day. 366/1 on the day means that Australia's position in this Test is nearly unassailable after only six sessions of play. With India's batsmen in indifferent touch, it looks like India will go into the third Test of series in Australia with no hope of winning the series for the second series in a row.

I have nothing to add to yesterday's post about why I think this might be happening. What was notable about India's effort in this bowling innings is that the four specialist bowlers could not, between them cobble together even the first 80 overs of the innings. Virat Kohli and Virender Sehwag  bowled a dozen overs between overs 60 and 80 in the Indian innings. This suggests a basic failing - that India's fast bowlers cannot be relied upon to bowl 20 good overs in a day. It would be easy to blame Dhoni for bowling Kohli and Sehwag. However, the fact is that come the 60th over, Umesh Yadav had bowled 14 overs for 74 runs, while Ishant Sharma had bowled 16 overs for 74 runs. Ishant had failed to bowl a maiden, while Umesh Yadav had bowled only 2. Zaheer, by contrast had bowled 18 overs for 58 runs, with three wickets to his name.

Fast Bowling remains a problem, not because they're not getting wickets, but because they're unable to control the scoring. India's limitations have been exposed in the last 12 months, and they are deep ones with no short term solution in sight.

2 comments:

  1. 4-0 is increasingly looking likely here.

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  2. Rohit HippalgaonkarJanuary 05, 2012 8:53 PM

    " What was notable about India's effort in this bowling innings is that the four specialist bowlers could not, between them cobble together even the first 80 overs of the innings. Virat Kohli and Virender Sehwag bowled a dozen overs between overs 60 and 80 in the Indian innings. "

    that's a ridiculous argument against the bowlers (while I'm not defending the overall quality of bowling on show). Mike Hussey and Clarke also bowled 10 overs between them in the first 80 overs of India's 2nd inns at Sydney. is that a reflection on the Aussie bowlers?

    this and your previous post takes away the blame from the batting which in away Tests had crossed 300 only once in all of 2011. 'standards must be really low' to keep rationalizing these rank failures. the reason India were the best Test side for a while was largely their batting (squeezing out draws and some wins from hopeless situations), but the reason for our rapid fall from there has also been the batting. losing 20 wickets regularly without scoring enough runs.

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